What is Mediation?

Mediation is a voluntary and confidential dispute resolution process in which a neutral mediator assists parties in finding a lasting win-win solution to their conflict. Mediation lets people speak for themselves and make their own decisions.

Mediation is an informal process done in a neutral and private setting with two professionally trained volunteer mediators. They will:

  • Listen as you explain the issues of the conflict;
  • Ask questions to help you and the other person clarify and understand the issues;
  • Guide you through a process to develop solutions; and
  • Assist you in writing up an agreement that works for everyone involved.

Neutral.

The mediator will not takes sides, assess blame, or tell you what to do. The mediator will not force you to make a decision.

Confidential.

The mediation process is confidential, except in cases of child abuse, elder abuse, and credible threats of violence. The mediators will not give information shared in the mediation process with anyone outside the process.

Voluntary.

Mediation is voluntary. Either participant can end the mediation process at any time and no one can be forced to agree to anything that they do not want.

The agreement is a summary of the solutions you and the other person make to solve your dispute. The agreement may be a legally binding document if you wish. To prepare for mediation, think about what you need and what you are willing to do to achieve it.